Sounds from Space

 

Sounds from famous and historical Space Objects

In the following table you will find some really historical sound files from famous space objects. This page started when I received an audio cassette with some historical sound files from my friend Alois Ochojski DL3PD (SK silent key since April 2007). They were derived from a phono-card, which he had received in 1962 from the national broadcast service of CSSR. Alois was kind enough to record them to tape and I finally converted them to digital audio files. You can hear an introduction to these files read by Alois DL3PD (SK) by clicking on his picture on the right. The original comments are in Czech language. Please excuse the partially poor quality of the sound files. Keep in mind that most of the records are quite old.

Many thanks for the recordings to Alois Ochojski DL3PD (SK), Roy Welch W0SL, Sven Grahn, Maik Hermenau, Dick Flagg AH6NM, Don P. Mitchell, Bill Chaikin KA8VIT Dick Daniels W4PUJ (SK), Bob Patterson K5DZE, Tobias Lindemann, Josef Huber, Nils von Storch, Federico Manzini and Larry R. Baysinger W4EJA.

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Launch
Date

Weight

Sputnik 1
Sputnik I
#00002 
1957-001B
1957 Alpha 2

This first man made satellite in space was launched by USSR into an elliptical orbit with an inclination of 65 degrees, a perigee of 238 km and an apogee of 947 km. Sputnik 1 needed 96,2 minutes to circulate the Earth. The spherical satellite had a diameter of 58cm and carried 2 radio beacons transmitting on 20.005 MHz and 40.010 MHz. The batteries powering the transmitters had a lifetime of 21 days. Sputnik 1 reentered the Earth's atmosphere after 92 days and decayed on January 4th 1958. Recording kindly provided by Alois DL3PD (SK).

Oct 4th 1957

83,6 kg

On October 6th 1957 around 20:00 UTC Sputnik 1 was received on 20 MHz by Bayrische Volkssternwarte in Munich. The recording was kindly provided by Tobias Lindemann and Josef Huber.

This audio file was recorded by Roy W0SL in Dallas, Texas on October 7th, 1957 at 0457UTC using a military surplus AN/FRR3A HF RTTY receiver tuned to 20.007 MHz. Thanks Roy for providing this recording.

This recording is from an unknown German ham-radio amateur. It was filtered and provided by Don P. Mitchell.

An unknown British SWL is commenting the reception of Sputnik 1 on October 11th 1957 at 10:58pm. The original source of this recording is unknown. The recording was kindly provided by Bill KA8VIT. (Please note that this recording is 5MB large).

Enclosed recording of Sputnik 1 is from a radio station in Milwaukee. The recording is from vinyl no. 1 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Sputnik 2
Sputnik II
Physical lab
PS 2
#00003
1957-002A
1957 Beta 1

Sputnik 2 was the first spaceship which brought an animal in space. The elliptical orbit had an apogee of 1770 km and an apogee of 320 km. Sputnik II circulated the Earth in 103,7 minutes.
Sputnik 2 was a three-part conical satellite with a hight of 1.2m and was comprised of the following sections:
- a cylindrical container for scientific equipment
- a spherical container for batteries, 2 transmitters and radiotelemetry systems
- a sealed cabin for the a dog named Laika
Laika lived for one week and part of the downlink telemetry was her heartbeat. She died on November 10
th 1957 when oxygen in her capsule was exhausted.
Sputnik II transmitted for 7 days on the frequencies 20.005 MHz and 40.010 MHz.
Sputnik 2 decayed on April 14
th 1958. This recording was provided by Alois DL3PD (SK).

Nov 3rd 1957

508 kg

Enclosed is the recording of the heartbeat of the dog Laika aboard Sputnik 2. The recording is from vinyl no. 2 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

In June 2010 I received from Dick W4PUJ (SK)
(ex WA4DGU) together with a number of other unique audio recordings enclosed recording of Sputnik II. Thanks Dick for providing this recording. Dick became silent key on February 14
th 2012.

Explorer 1
Explorer I
1958 Alpha 1
#00004
1958-001A

Explorer 1 was America's first orbiting satellite. It was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida by an Army Jupiter C four stage rocket into an elliptical orbit with an inclination of 33,3 degrees, a perigee of 320 km  and an apogee of 2735 km. Explorer 1 circulated the Earth in 114,7 minutes.
The cylindrical satellite was 1.5m long and had a diameter of 15cm. Explorer 1 featured 2 transmitters. The transmitter on 108,03 MHz had a transmit power of 60 mW and operated 14 days, the transmitter on 108,0 MHz had a transmit power of 10 mW and transmitted until May 23
rd 1958. The transmissions included information about the satellites temperature, cosmic rays and micro-meteorites. In the second picture to the left you can see a mesh of wires around the upper part of the satellite. This was used to detect micro-meteorites. Explorer 1 discovered the Van Allen radiation belt.
The batteries lasted about 3 months.  Explorer 1 decayed on March 31st 1970.

Jan 31st 1958

13,5 kg

This recording of the countdown and launch of Explorer 1 is from vinyl no. 2 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

This recording was made by Roy W0SL in Dallas, Texas on February 11th, 1958 at 01:00 UTC using a home-made VHF converter in front of a National NC-300 receiver. This recording was kindly provided by Roy W0SL.

Another recording of Explorer I was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ (SK).

This recording of Explorer 1 is from vinyl no. 4 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Vanguard 1
TV-4
1958 Beta 2
#00005
1958-002B

This is the oldest man-made satellite which is still in orbit. It is expected to last about another 190 years before it finally decays. This spherical Navy test satellite has a diameter of 16cm and was launched by a Vanguard 3-stage rocket into an elliptical orbit with an inclination of 34,4 degrees, a perigee of 640 km and an apogee of 4020 km. The satellite had 2 power sources: the first transmitter operated from a mercury cell supply and had a life time of 3 weeks. Thanks to the fact that this satellite was the first using solar cells the second transmitter operated 6 years and 3 months. On February 21st 1965 it was declared to be no more recognizable as the signal strength had declined almost to zero. The output power of the transmitters was 100mW (on 108.0 MHz) and 50mW (on 108.3 MHz) respectively. The antenna system was comprised of 6 whip elements each 30cm long. They made one turnstile antenna and a dipole. The telemetry transmitted was the package temperature indicated by the difference between the two transmitter frequencies. Therefore, the recordings were made with the receiver Beat Frequency Oscillator (BFO) turned on in order to produce an audible tone heard in the recordings. Thanks for the audio-file to Roy W0SL.

Mar 17th 1958

1.5 kg

This recording of the countdown and launch of Vanguard 1 is from vinyl no. 2 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

This recording of Vanguard 1 while it was in its 7th orbit. It is from vinyl no. 3 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

This recording of Vanguard I was done while it was battery powered and kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ (SK).

This recording of Vanguard I was done while it was solar powered and kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ (SK).

This recording of Vanguard I was done after it was already 3 months in operation and kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ (SK).

Vanguard 1 transmitted until February 21st 1965. This recording of Vanguard I was done after it was already 1 year in operation and kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ (SK).

Lunik I
Luna 1
Mechta
#00112
1959-012A

Luna 1 was the first of a series of Soviet automatic interplanetary stations successfully launched in the direction of the Moon. It actually landed on the Moon.

Jan 2nd 1959

361 kg

This recording of a Lunik probe was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ (SK). It is possibly from Lunik I but we are not sure. It could be also based on transmissions of Lunik II or Lunik III.

Vostok-3 No.1
Sputnik 9
Korabl Sputnik 4
#00091
1961-008A

This Space Ship Vostok-3 No.1 carried a dog named Chernuska in space. Besides Chernuska also onboard was a dummy cosmonaut, mice and a guinea pig. The flight lasted for a single orbit, and a successful recovery was made. Recording provided by Alois DL3PD (SK).

Mar 9th 1961

4700 kg

Russian
Spaceship
Vostok 1
#00103
1961-012A

 (crew: Jurij Gagarin)

The first man in space: Jurij Gagarin. He circulated the Earth in his Russian Spaceship Vostok 1 during his flight which had a duration of 108 minutes. Recording provided by Alois DL3PD (SK).

Apr 12th 1961

4725 kg

Vinyl single made in USSR
"12-IV 1961 CCCP Gagarin" side 1 with Russian comments. Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

Vinyl single made in USSR
"12-IV 1961 CCCP Gagarin" side 2 with German comments. Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

Colorvox "Schallbildkarte"
"Reportage über den Weltraumflug Juri Gagarins". Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

Report in German language about the phase between the first artificial satellite Sputnik 1 and the first man in space Juri Gagarin. From a Schallfolie "Der Weg in den Kosmos" which was provided in the 60s by a Eastern German magazine called "Frösi". Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

US Spaceship
Freedom 7
MR-3
MERCR3

(crew: Alan B. Shepard Jr.)

Alan B. Shepard Jr. (1924-1998) was the first American in space. His flight in a Mercury capsule on top of a Redstone-MRLV rocket had a duration of 15 minutes and 28 seconds. As this was a ballistic suborbital flight reaching an altitude of 187 km it did not get a International nor a NORAD designator. His recovery at sea was viewed on live TV. 10 years later Al Shepard was the commander of Apollo 14 and landed on the Moon.

May 5th 1961

955 kg

These recording are from vinyls no. 24 and no. 25 which were included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. They include sequences of the launch campaign as well as Shepard's voice while he was in orbit ("What a beautiful view ..."). Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Liberty Bell 7
MR-4
MERCR4

(crew: Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom)

Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom (1926-1967) was the second American in space. His flight in a Mercury Redstone 4 (MR-4) had a duration of 15 minutes and 37 seconds. The main configuration differences from the MR-3 spacecraft was the addition of a large viewing window and an explosively actuated side hatch (which actually failed during landing). As this was a ballistic suborbital flight reaching an altitude of 187 km it did not get a International nor a NORAD designator.

July 21st 1961

955 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 27 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. They include sequences of the launch campaign as well as Shepard's voice while he was in orbit ("What a beautiful view ..."). Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Russian
Spaceship
Vostok 2
Sputnik 12
#00168
1961-019A

(crew: Gherman S. Titov)

Russian Spaceship Vostok 2 (3KA-4) with cosmonaut Gherman S. Titov was launched by a Vostok rocket from Baikonur (U.S.S.R.) into an 166x232 km orbit with 65° inclination. The flight lasted 1 day and 1 hour during with G.S. Titov circulated the earth 17 times.

Aug 6th 1961

4731 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 28 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. It includes multiple recordings of Titov's voice while he was in orbit. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

US Spaceship
Friendship 7
Mercury Atlas 6
#00240
1962-003A

(crew: John Glenn)

Report in German language about the first US astronaut John Glenn circulating the Earth. During his flight in MA 6 (Mercury Atlas 6) he circulated the Earth 3 times. Heftbeilage der Hauszeitschrift "Die Brücke" Nr.2 vom Oktober 1962 der Pharmazeutischen Medizinischen Abteilung der Farbwerke Hoechst AG. Recording provided by Maik Hermenau.

Feb 20th 1962

1900 kg

The voice of John Glenn "Roger, zero G and I feel fine, capsule is turning around". Recording courtesy of NASA.

The voice of John Glenn "We got speed - John Glenn". Recording courtesy of NASA.

Voskhod-2
1965-022A
#01274

(crew: Pawel Iwanowitsch Beljajew, Alexej Archipowitsch Leonow )

Voskhod 2, which carried two men into space, was equipped with an extendable air lock that permitted Leonov's exit into space without having to evacuate the main cabin air. It was the first flight with an extra vehicular activity (EVA) and cosmonaut Alexej Archipowitsch Leonow was the first man who left a spacecraft and operated in free space. The other crew member was commander Pawel Iwanowitsch Beljajew. The flight of Voskhod 2 lasted for 26 hours and 16 orbits were completed. A manually controlled reentry was performed because of a malfunction of the automatic orientation devices for the retrofire. The spacecraft landed in a pine forest far north of the target area. After locating the spacecraft, one day was required to cut through the forest and bring the crew out on skis. Overall the mission was a success. After Leonow retired he started to create paintings of his experience in space. Enclosed is a painting of his EVA.

Voskhod-2 transmitted voice on 143.625 MHz, 18.035 MHz and 17.365 MHz and had a beacon transmitter on 19.996 MHz. The 143.625 MHz FM transmissions were used for line-of-sight communications with ground stations while the short-wave frequencies were used to communicate with the spacecraft when it was far from Soviet territory.

March 18th 1965

5682 kg

Enclosed audio file is from a report about the Voskhod-2 focusing on the EVA of Alexej Leonow. Supposedly the radio traffic in the report was recorded during Leonows EVA.

Apollo 8

first manned mission to fly and orbit the Moon

(crew: William Anders, James Lovell, Frank Borman)

CSM-103
#03626
1968-118A

Originally Apollo 8 wasn't going to the Moon but was supposed to have a low-earth orbit to test the Lunar Module and Command Module. However, since the Lunar Module wasn't ready, NASA decided to change the mission objectives and send Apollo 8 to orbit the Moon 10 times. The crew William Anders, James Lovell and Frank Borman was retrained in record time for a completely new mission. They were the first three humans to see the dark side of the Moon and their voyage was the first ever to escape Earth's gravitational force and visit another celestial body.  On Christmas Eve 1968, when approaching lunar sunrise, the 3 crew members sent a famous broadcast message back to Earth when taking turns reading the first 10 verses from the book of Genesis. Audio courtesy of NASA (3MB).

Dec 21st 1968

28817 kg

Apollo 11

first manned mission to land on the moon
(crew: Neil. A. Armstrong, Edwin E. Aldrin, Michael Collins)

Command & Service Module
CSM-107
#04039
1969-059A

Lunar Module
LM/EASEP
#04041
1969-059C

Apollo 11 was the first manned mission to land on the moon. The LM (landing module) spacecraft transmitted at S-band with a carrier frequency of 2282.5 MHz both live television (FM modulated) as well as telemetry (on PM modulated sub-carriers). This communication system was collectively referred to as the Unified S-Band Communication System. Alan Bean, who travelled to the moon aboard Apollo 12 and was the 4th man on the moon, painted pictures of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. Reprints are still available. You can find a picture if you click on the icon to the right.

Jul 16th 1969

28801 kg

The audio file enclosed documents the successful launch sequence. Recorded on July 16th 1969.

The famous words of Neil Armstrong, the first man on the Moon, when he stepped on the moon. Recorded on July 20th 1969.

The second man to step on the moon was Edwin E. Aldrin. This video shows him climbing down the ladder. This video was received by Parkes Observatory in Australia. Video courtesy of NASA.

President Nixon talks with the Astronauts and wished for ".. peace and tranquility on the Earth." This video was received by Parkes Observatory in Australia. Video courtesy of NASA.

Vinyl single "First man on the moon" side 1 includes the speech of J.F.Kennedy announcing the plan to go to the moon. Record provided by Maik Hermenau.

Vinyl single "First man on the moon" side 2 includes the launch of Apollo 11 and landing of Eagle. Record provided by Maik Hermenau.

Part 1 of a report in German language about the first manned mission to the moon, Vinyl LP "Original Dokumente vom Weg zum Mond" war 1970 eine Beilageder Zeitschrift "Bunte Illustrierte". Record provided by Maik Hermenau (11 minutes).

Part 2 of a report in German language about the first manned mission to the moon, Vinyl LP "Original Dokumente vom Weg zum Mond" war 1970 eine Beilageder Zeitschrift "Bunte Illustrierte". Record provided by Maik Hermenau (15 minutes).

On July 21th 1969 03:51 UTC Larry Bassinger, a ham radio amateur with the callsign W4EJA living in Louisville, Kentucky, USA made a remarkable accomplishment:
He was able to receive the VHF radio transmission from astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin directly while they were walking on the moon. Larry used modified surplus radio equipment and a home-brew corner reflector antenna built with chicken wire. He received the 259.7 MHz AM transmitter in the backpack of Armstrong which he used to communicate with the Lunar Module. In enclosed recording one can hear the voice of Armstrong and also that of Aldrin because the backpack of Armstrong received also the voice of Aldrin on 279.0 MHz in FM and retransmitted it also to the LM. Recording kindly provided by Larry Baysinger.

Apollo 12

(crew: Charles "Pete" Conrad, Richard "Dick" F. Gordon, Alan L. "Al" Bean)

CSM-108
#04225
1969-099A

This was the 2nd mission of Apollo with a landing on the moon. The rocket was struck twice (36 seconds and 52 seconds after launch) by a lightning. You can hear the launch campaign including the conversation about the lightning strikes in the first audio recording.
The second audio files documents communication between LM (the lunar module with the nickname "Intrepid") and Houston ground control during the final descent phase (last 3 minutes) and the touch down on the moon (110 h, 32 min and 36 sec mission elapsed time).
The crew returned safely on November 24
th 1969.
I extracted the recordings from the NASA audio collection.
Alan L. Bean was the 4th man on the moon. After he left NASA he became an artist and started painting beautiful scenes of the moon. Enclosed a picture of himself which he named "A New Frontier".

Nov 14th 1969

 28790 kg

Apollo 13

aborted third manned mission to the moon (crew: James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., Fred W. Haise, Jr. )

CSM-109
#04371
1970-029A

This aborted 3rd manned mission to moon ended almost fatal. Due to an explosion of the oxygen tank in the service module the mission had to be aborted and luckily the crew returned safely on April 17th 1970. See here a short movie of the damaged service module when clicking on the picture to the right.

Apr 11th 1970

136077 kg

Listen to the famous words of J. Swigert after the explosion of the tank: "Houston, we've had a problem here."

Apollo 17

last manned mission to the moon (crew: Eugene A. Cernan, Harrison H. Schmitt, Ronald E. Evans)

CSM-114
#06300
1972-096A

Apollo 17 was the 6th and last Apollo mission during which humans walked on the lunar surface. On December 11th 1972 commander Cernan and lunar module (LM) pilot Schmitt landed in the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon. The Command and Service Module (CSM) with its pilot Evans continued in its lunar orbit. During their stay on the Moon, the astronauts set up scientific experiments, took photographs, drove around with the rover and collected lunar samples. The LM took off from the Moon on December 14th and the astronauts returned to Earth on December 19th.

Dec 7th 1972

30320 kg

Enclosed recording of the audio link between the team on the moon while driving around with the rover and the ground staff on Earth was recorded on December 13th 1972 around 05:00 UTC by Bob K5DZE (ex DA1EZ). It was actually a live re-transmission on 7.524 MHz in SSB between 2 NASA stations. You can hear in this excellent 20 minutes long recording the slow but strong fading of the signal coming from the moon. Many thanks to Bob K5DZE for kindly providing this interesting recording.

Enclosed voice transmission of Apollo-17 while in earth orbit was received on 296.8 MHz on December 7th 1972 at 07:08 UTC by R.S. (Dick) Flagg and Sven Grahn in Titusville, Florida.
This recording was kindly provided by Sven Grahn with permission of R.S. (Dick) Flagg.

Enclosed voice transmission of Apollo-17 while in lunar  orbit was received on 2287.5 MHz on December 12th 1972 by R.S. (Dick) Flagg and Sven Grahn in Biven's Arm, Gainesville, Florida.
This recording was kindly provided by Sven Grahn with permission of R.S. (Dick) Flagg.

STS-1
Columbia
#12399
1981-034A

German report about the first launch of a space shuttle: STS-1 Columbia which was broadcasted by Bayrischer Rundfunk. Record provided by Maik Hermenau.
You can find many more recordings from Spaceships like he Space Shuttle in the respective section of this website. 

Apr 12th 1981

4908 kg

MIR Space Station
#16609
1986-017A

Mir (english peace), a Russian space station, was the world's first consistently inhabited long-term research station in space. Constructed from 1986 to 1996 using a modular design (core module launched February 20th 1986) the station was in operation for fifteen years before it was deliberately de-orbited and re-entered into the atmosphere over the South Pacific Ocean on March 23rd 2001. 10 years after its reentry I built a model of MIR which is now in my bookshelf and a nice reminiscence of the various contacts I had with people onboard MIR.

Feb 20th
1986 (core module)

140000 kg

The first crew to visit MIR were Leonid Kizim and Vladimir Soloviev. Their Soyuz T-15 spacecraft was launched on March 13th 1986 and they docked to MIR on March 14th. They stayed in space for 125 days and during that time even travelled from MIR to Salyut 6 and back before finally returning back to earth.
The first audio file was recorded by Sven Grahn on March 15th 1986 15:27 UTC on 121.75 MHz, apparently shortly after they entered MIR. Many thanks to Sven Grahn.
The second audio file was recorded the day after on March 16th 1986 14:14 UTC on 143.625 MHz also by Sven Grahn.

International Space Station ISS
#25544 
1998-067A

The first crew of the ISS was the team of Commander William M. Shepherd, Soyuz Pilot Yuri P. Gidzenko and Flight Engineer Sergei Krikalev. They arrived with a Soyuz spacecraft on Nov. 2nd 2000 and stayed 136 days.
In the sound file enclosed Bill Shepherd is thanking the ground crews. Recorded shortly after arrival of the 1st crew on Nov. 2nd 2000 at 12:27 UTC on 143.625 MHz by Sven Grahn.
You can find many more recordings from Spaceships like ISS in the respective section of this website.

Nov 20th
1998
(Zarja module)

183283 kg

STS-135
Atlantis OV-104
#37736
2011-031A

STS-135 was the final shutttle mission. It was launched in July 8th 2011 from Kennedy Space Center and docked to ISS on July 10th 2011 at 15:07 UTC. STS-135 Atlantis's External Tank video downlink was received over Europe by Nils von Storch 24 minutes after launch on 2272.5 MHz FM. Normally an internal timer disables the 10 Watts s-band video transmitter onboard the External Tank (ET) about 15 Minutes after launch, to avoid interference with S-Band communication systems in Europe. On this final Space Shuttle mission however, engineers decided to disable the timer in order to capture video from the ETs perspective when it re-entries the earths atmosphere about 60 minutes after launch. Unfortunately the signal was at 4° elevation only before disappearing behind the horizon again, which is the reason why the received video is only so short. Equipment used to receive this video was a 90cm mesh dish with 3,5 turn RHCP Helix for 2250 MHz, EME103B S-Band LNA and a G1MFG S-Band video receiver. Thanks to Nils for sharing this video with us. The mission lasted 13 days ending with a landing at Cape Canaveral on July 21st 2011 at 09:55 UTC. Please note that the .mp4-video is almost 20 MByte large.

Jul 8th 2011

5000 kg

If you have further recordings from space objects please let me know. I will be happy to add them to my homepage. Many thanks in advance.

Vy 55 & 73 de Matthias DD1US               


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