Sounds from Space

 

Sounds from Scientific, Meteorological and Commercial Satellites 1962-1966

This part of my audio collection is dedicated to commercial and scientific satellites. I started this separate section when Greg Roberts, ZS1BI in Cape Town, started to convert some of his old recordings from a tape recorder with elastic belt drives to electronic format. Greg is a retired professional astronomer and since 1957 has been actively involved in the tracking of artificial satellites, both by optical and radio means. Click on his picture to the right to get more information about him and his activities.

Greg Roberts ZS1BI

Many thanks to Greg Roberts ZS1BI for getting this section started and to all the other people who kindly contributed: Alois Ochojski DL3PD/SK, Roy Welch W0SL, Sven Grahn, Kurt Ringel DF7FU, Chris Gross, Mike D. Kenny, Brian Hougesen OZ1SKY, Michael Fletcher OH2AUE, Dale Ireland, Alan Banks, Paul Marsh M0EYT, Patrick DK193WN, Mike Rupprecht DK3WN, Loren Moline WA7SKT, Maik Hermenau, Jean-Louis Rault F6AGR, Dick Flagg AH6NM, Don P. Mitchell, Bill Chaikin KA8VIT, Dick Daniels W4PUJ/SK, Patrick Hajagos, Henk Hamoen PA3GUO, Thomas Koziel DG3IX, Tobias Lindemann, Josef Huber, Tetsu-san JA0CAW, Jan PE0SAT, Nils von Storch, Darko 9A3LI, Federico Manzini, Phil Williams, Jos Heymann, Roland Proesch DF3LZ, Davide D'Aliesio IW0HLG, Giulio Manzoni IV3DTB/9V1FC, Fer Paglia IW1DTU, Enrico Gobbetti IW2AGJ, Raydel Abreu Espinet CM2ESP, Flavio PY2ZX, Frederick W. Krappe, Colin Mackellar, Aitor Conde, Davide D'Aliesio IW0HLG, Jean-Pierre Godet F5YG, Milen Rangelov, Francisco EA7ADI and Luc VE2FXL.

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Launch
Date

Weight

TIROS-4
A 9
TIROS-D
1962-Beta-1
#00226
(1962-002A)

TIROS 4 (Television and InfraRed Observation Satellite) was a meteorogical satellite and launched on an Delta DM-19 rocket from Cape Canaveral.

Feb 8th 1962

129 kg

Enclosed signal of TIROS-D during its orbit #1782 was received on June 12th 1962 by Volkssternwarte Munich, also called "Satellitenbeobachtungsstation Munich II". The signal was received on 136.23 MHz. TIROS-4 was the first of its series to use a 136 MHz instead of the previously used 108 MHZ. There is an additional time pulse signal inserted in the recording which was kindly provided by Tobias Lindemann and Josef Huber.

This recording is from vinyl no. 39which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

OSO 1
S 16
#00255
(1962-006A)

OSO 1 (Orbiting Solar Observatory) was launched from Cape Canaveral into a 550kmx595km orbit with an inclination of 32.85°. It was the first satellite to have pointed instruments and onboard tape recorders for data storage. OSO 1 transmitted data on 136.744 MHz on 75 solar flares until August 6th 1963. It decayed on October 8th 1981.

Mar 7th 1962

207.7 kg

This recording of OSO 1 was done from Heinz Kaminski at Observatorium Bochum/Germany and is from vinyl no. 43 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

KOSMOS 1
COSMOS 1
DS-2
Sputnik 11
#00266
(1962-008A)

DS-2 (Dnepropetrovsk Sputnik 2) is the second development version of the Denpropetrovsk Sputnik series. After two unsuccessful launches of the DS-1 satellite, the simplified DS-2 satellite, which omitted the central cylindrical section for mission avionics, was successfully launched on March 16th 1962. After reaching orbit it received the designator KOSMOS 1. It employed radio methods to study the structure of the ionosphere. It transmitted on 20.006 MHz and 90.027 MHz. It decayed on May 25th 1962.

March 16th 1962

47 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 42 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Cosmos 1 was received by the observatory in Bochum. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

KOSMOS 2
COSMOS 2
1MS
Sputnik 12
#00269
(1962-009A)

The 1MS series were prototypes of small battery powered research satellites. The objective was to test systems for future satellites and to record data about cosmic radiation. After its successful launch it got the designator KOSMOS-2. It decayed on October 25th 1962.

April 6th 1962

285 kg

I am searching for sound files. Please send them to

Ariel 1
UK 1
S 51
1962-Omicron-1
#00285
(1962-015A)

Ariel 1 was built and operated by UK and launched on an American Thor-Delta rocket from Cape Canaveral. Ariel 1 was designed to contribute to the current knowledge of the ionosphere and of sun-ionosphere relationships. The satellite was a 62 kg cylinder with a 58-cm diameter and a height of 22 cm. It decayed on April 24th 1976.

April 26th 1962

62 kg

Enclosed signal was received on June 12th 1962 at 16:42 UTC by Volkssternwarte Munich which was also called "Satellitenbeobachtungsstation Munich II". The signal was received on 136.408 MHz. There is an additional time pulse signal inserted in the recording which was kindly provided by Tobias Lindemann and Josef Huber.

Enclosed signal was received probably on June 23rd 1962 at 02:10 UTC by Volkssternwarte Munich. Please note that the satellite signal is the multitone signal in the background. There is an additional time pulse signal inserted in the recording which was kindly provided by Tobias Lindemann and Josef Huber.

This recording of ARIEL 1 is from vinyl no. 43 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Enclosed signal was received by Bruce Window at Island Lagoon Minitrack station (part of Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Stations) and kindly provided by Colin Mackellar.

KOSMOS 4
COSMOS 4
Sputnik 14
#00287
(1962-014A)

KOSMOS 4 was one of a series of Soviet earth satellites whose purpose was to study outer space, the upper layers of the atmosphere, and the earth. Scientific data and measurements were relayed to earth by multichannel telemetry systems equipped with space-borne memory units. It transmitted on 19.995 MHz. The mission of Cosmos 4 was to measure radiation before and after the US nuclear tests conducted during project Starfish. The reconnaissance satellite was recovered on April 29th 1962.

April 26th 1962

4600 kg

COSMOS 4 was recorded by Heinz Kaminski in Bochum/Germany and is from vinyl no. 43 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

KOSMOS 5
COSMOS 5
2MS #2
Sputnik 15
#00297
(1962-020A)

KOSMOS 5 was a scientific and research satellite launched into  an elliptical low Earth orbit with an inclination of 49.1 degree and a perigee of 192 km and a perigee of 1578 km. It decayed on May 2nd 1963.

May 28th 1962

280 kg

KOSMOS 5 was received on June 23rd 1962 from 18:58 until 19:17 UTC on 20.008 MHz by Volkssternwarte Munich based in Sommerstrasse.

COSMOS 5 was also received on September 2nd 1962 at 17:42 UTC by Volkssternwarte Munich. Recording kindly provided by Tobias Lindemann and Josef Huber.

TIROS-5
TIROS-E
1962-
aa-1
#00309
(1962-025A)

TIROS-5 was a meteorological satellite. It included television cameras and returned 58226 cloud cover photos until May 4th 1963. It transmitted tracking beacons on 136.230 and 136.920 Mhz. It also featured a 5W television transmitter on 235 MHz. Signal on 136.230 MHz recorded on Dec 14th 1973 in CW by Greg Roberts.

Jun 19th 1962

130 kg

Signal on 136.920 MHz recorded on Dec 14th 1973 in CW by Greg Roberts.

Signal on 136.920 MHz recorded on Dec 14th 1973 in AM by Greg Roberts.

Signal on 136.920 MHz recorded on Dec 14th 1973 in FM by Greg Roberts.

Signal on 136.230 MHz recorded on June 7th 1975 in CW by Greg Roberts.

This recording is from vinyl no. 51 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

TELSTAR 1
#00340
(1962-029A)

Telstar 1, primarily a communications satellite providing 60 simultaneous telephone conversations, carried an experiment designed to measure the energetic proton and electron distribution in the Van Allen belts. Scientific information was transmitted by the spacecraft telemetry beacon on 136 MHz via a PCM/FM/AM encoder. The telemetry sequence required about 1 min. Another beacon was at 4080 MHz and the communication experiments operated on simplex (4170 MHz, 2.25 Watts) and duplex (4165 MHz, 1 Watt and 4175 MHz, 1 Watt).

July 10th 1962

171 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 46 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. It includes the signal of the telemetry channel as well as the first phone call via Telstar. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Alouette-1
Alouette-A
1962-ß
a-1
#00424
(1962-049A)

Alouette 1 was a Canadian small ionospheric observatory instrumented with an ionospheric sounder, a VLF receiver, an energetic particle detector, and a cosmic noise experiment. Extended from the satellite shell were two dipole antennas (45.7 m and 22.8 m long, respectively) which were shared by three of the experiments on the spacecraft. Alouette-1 had a tracking beacons transmitting with 50 mWatts on 136.980 MHz and two telemetry transmitter on 136.080 MHz (2 Watts) and 136.590 MHz (0.25 Watts).

Sept. 29th 1962

145 kg

 This recording is from vinyl no. 52 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Explorer 14
EPE-B
1962-Beta-Gamma-1
#00432
(1962-051A)

   Explorer 14 was a spin-stabilized, solar-cell-powered spacecraft launched by the USA into a highly elliptical orbit (300kmx85300km). It measured cosmic-ray particles, trapped particles, solar wind protons and magnetospheric and interplanetary magnetic fields. Explorer 14 transmitted on 136 MHz with 2 Watts until November 1963. It decayed on July 1st 1966.

Oct 2nd 1962

40 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 53 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Enclosed signal was received by Bruce Window at Island Lagoon Minitrack station (part of Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Stations) and kindly provided by Colin Mackellar.

Explorer 15
EPE-C
S 3B
#00445
(1962-059A)

Explorer 15 was a spin-stabilized, solar-cell-powered spacecraft instrumented to study the artificial radiation belt produced by the Starfish high-altitude nuclear burst of July 1962. It was part of the Energetic Particles Explorer (EPE) series of satellites. A 16-channel PFM/PM time-division multiplexed telemeter was used. The time required to sample the 16 channels (one frame period) was 0.323 s. Half of the channels were used to convey eight-level digital information, and the others were used for analog information.

Oct. 27th 1962

44,4 kg

 This recording was done in Bochum/Germany and is part of vinyl no. 56 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

ANNA-1B
#00446
(1962-060A)

Anna 1B was a US Navy geodetic satellite launched from Cape Canaveral by a Thor Able Star rocket.

Oct. 31st 1962

161 kg

 This recording was done in Bochum/Germany and is part of vinyl no. 56 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Injun 3
Injun 2B
#00504
(1962-067B)

Injun 3 was a magnetic field-aligned-spacecraft instrumented for a study of geophysical phenomena, particularly high-latitude and auroral, using an integrated system of several particle detectors, a VLF detector, and three auroral photometers. It transmitted on 136.870 MHz also "Starfish" radiation data. Injun-3 decayed on August 25th 1968.

Dec 13th 1962

52 kg

This recording of Injun 3 is from vinyl no. 57 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Relay 1
Relay A
#00503
(1962-068A)

Relay 1 was primarily a communications satellite built by NASA. The spin-stabilized spacecraft included in addition radiation experiments designed to map the earth's radiation belts. It transmitted on 136.140 MHz and 136.620 MHz tracking and telemetry data with 250 mW. Further it featured a wideband transmitter with 11 W at 4170 MHz. Finally it supported 2-way telephone and other narrow-band traffic with the transmitters on 4165 MHz and 4175 MHz (11 W each).

Dec 13th 1962

78 kg

   Enclosed signals were recorded on 136.140 MHz in the time between March 1964 and February 1965 by Greg Roberts in Durban.

Cosmos 12
KOSMOS 12
Zenit-2 #7
#00517
(1962-072A)

Cosmos 12 was a Soviet surveillance satellite launched from Baikonur aboard a Vostok 2 rocket. It transmitted on 19.995 MHz. The capsule was recovered after 8 days on December 30th 1962.

Dec 22nd 1962

4730 kg

 This recording is part of vinyl no. 58 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Explorer 17
AE-A
S 6
#00564
(1963-0009A)

Explorer 17 was a spin-stabilized stainless-steel sphere 0.95 m in diameter. The spacecraft was vacuum sealed in order to prevent contamination of the local atmosphere. It measured neutral particle density, neutral particle concentrations, and ion concentration and electron temperature measurements.

Apr. 3rd 1963

184 kg

 This recording is part of vinyl no. 57 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

TELSTAR 2
TELSTAR II
#00573
(1963-013A)

Telstar 2, primarily a communications satellite, carried an experiment designed to measure the energetic proton and electron distribution in the Van Allen belts. Telstar 2 differed from Telstar 1 by employing provisions for scientific information to be transmitted in real time via the microwave telemetry system so that telemetry could be obtained after the 2-yr timer had turned off the VHF beacon on 136.050 MHz (200 mW). The microwave tracking beacon was operating at 4079.73 MHz (20 mW). The communication experiment operated on 4169.72 MHz (2.25 W).

May 7th 1963

176 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 59 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

LOFTI-2A
#00601
(1963-021B)

The LOFTI (Low Frequency Trans Ionospheric Satellite) American earth magnetosphere satellites were launched in 1961, 1962 and 1963. LOFTI attempted to determine whether very low frequency (VLF) energy could penetrate through the ionosphere and be received by submerged submarines. The satellites demonstrated that under many ionospheric conditions VLF signals were extremely attenuated and could not be detected, making them unreliable for submarine communication. LOFTI-2A was launched on a Thor-DM21 Able-Star from Vandenberg AFB together with Poppy2A (Solrad6), Poppy2B, Poppy2C (Radose) and Surcal3. LOFTI-2A decayed on July 18th 1963.

June 15th 1963

99 kg

Enclosed signal was received by Bruce Window at Island Lagoon Minitrack station (part of Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Stations) and kindly provided by Colin Mackellar.

TIROS-7
TIROS-G
#00604
(1963-024A)

TIROS 7 (Television and InfraRed Observation Satellite) was a spin-stabilized meteorological spacecraft designed to test experimental television techniques and infrared equipment. Signal received either on 136.234 MHz or 136.922 MHz in the time between March 1964 and February 1965 by Greg Roberts in Durban/South Africa.

June 19th 1963

135 kg

RADOSE
Transit 5E1
SN39
#00671
(1963-038C)

RADOSE also called Radiation Sat measured energetic charged particles, magnetic fields, the solar spectrum, and acquired geodetic data. It transmitted in 136, 162 and 324 MHz bands. The last data were transmitted during November 1974. Recorded on July 2nd 1972 on 136.651 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Sept 28th 1963

25 kg

Radose recorded on Oct 24th 1973 on 136.651 MHz in CW/AM by Greg Roberts.

Relay 2
#00737
(1964-003A)

Relay 2 was primary a communications satellite but carried also a particle experiment. Recorded in frequency band 136-138 MHz using an SSB receiver by Greg Roberts sometime in the year 1974 or 1975.

Jan 21st 1964

184 kg

Relay 2 transmitted on two frequencies 136.140 MHz and 136.620 MHz. Multiple recordings were made on Dec 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts. First recording was 136.620 MHz in CW.

Second recording was on 136.620 MHz in AM on Dec 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

Third recording was on 136.140 MHz in CW on Dec 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

Fourth recording was again recorded in CW on Dec 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

Fifth recording was recorded in FM on Dec 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

Sixth recording was finally recorded in CW and AM on Oct 24th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

Echo 2
Echo C
#00740
(1964-004A)

 Echo 2 was a 41-m balloon of aluminum foil-mylar laminate. It decayed on June 7th 1969. Its surface was used to reflect 162 MHz signals back to Earth and thus act as a passive repeater. Echo 2 was the first joint space mission of the USA and of the USSR. The Echo 2 beacon signal enclosed was recorded either on 136.020 MHz or 136.170 MHz in various modes in the time between March 1964 and February 1965 by Greg Roberts in Durban.

Jan 25th 1964

256 kg

Ariel 2
S 52
S 52A
UK 2
UK-C
#00771
(1964-015A)

 Ariel 2 carried 3 British experiments to measure galactic radio noise. Echo 2 beacon recorded on 136.557 MHz in the time between March 1964 and February 1965 by Greg Roberts in Durban.

Mar 27th 1964

68 kg

Transit 5B-5
Transit O-2
OSCAR(NAV) 2
NNSS 30020
#00965
(1964-083D)

Radiation satellite. Studied magnetic field, celestial field, ultraviolet data. This satellite was still transmitting in mid 2007 and thus is probably the oldest satellite still transmitting. The sequence of tones has speeded up quite considerably over time. He transmits on 136.651 MHz in a SSB/FM multiplex mode. Signals enclosed were recorded first in AM and then in FM mode. Recorded on Dec 14th 1973 on 136.650 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Dec. 13th 1964

60 kg

The next 4 recording were made on June 19th 1999 on 136.650 MHz by Greg Roberts. He used a turnstile antenna at about 10 meters above ground followed by a low noise pre-amplifier with 20dB gain and about 1 dB noise figure. The first recording used the CW/SSB mode of the receiver with a bandwidth of 2.4 kHz.

The second file was also recorded using the CW/SSB mode with 2.4 kHz bandwidth. Since the satellite signal is quite broad (>30 kHz) one can easily hear several carriers when using this mode of reception.

Here Greg Roberts used a narrower (0.8 kHz) bandwidth filter to record the signal in CW/SSB mode. This bandwidth is recommended for very faint satellites since it cuts down the background noise.

This signal was recorded using the FM detector of the receiver with a bandwidth of approx. 25 to 30 kHz. Although the FM modulation of Transit 5B-5 is very low, one can easily hear the tones. Compare this to the CW/SSB recordings and it should be very obvious why any serious radio satellite tracker should have the capability of receiving CW or SSB modes. FM is not suitable for weak signals. Recorded by Greg Roberts.

Transit 5B-5 recorded on Oct 24th 1973 on 136.50 MHz in AM/CW mixed by Greg Roberts.

More than 46 years after its launch Transit 5B-5 was received and recorded on March 26th 2011 at 11:07 UTC on 136.645 MHz in USB by Patrick Hajagos.

Transit 5B-5 recorded on Oct 24th 1973 on 136.50 MHz in AM/CW mixed by Greg Roberts.

Transit 5B-5 was received on Dec. 30th 2012 at 07:45 UTC. The audio recording and also the waterfall plot show interesting modulation and frequency changes. Kindly provided by Flavio PY2ZX.

LES-1
#01002
(1965-008C)

LES- 1 (Lincoln Experimental Satellite 1) is a US military communications satellite launched from Cape Canaveral aboard a Titan 3A rocket. LES-1 failed to reach Geostationary position when the booster rockets failed leaving it in HEO. It was abandoned in 1967. Besides the UHF telemetry transmitter it featured also an X-band transmitter with 100mW output. More specifically this was a beacon transmitting at 7740 MHz and a communications transponder with an uplink at 8350 MHz and a downlink at 7750 MHz.

Feb 11th 1965

31 kg

Transmissions of LES-1 were discovered 47 years after its launch by Phil Williams in Cornwall/UK on Dec 18th 2012 and verified by other members of the #hearsat group. The transmissions are not every day and seem to be linked to extended periods of times when the satellite is in sunlight. It seems that the transmissions are  interrupted by the availability of extended times when the satellite is in sunlight. The satellite is evidently tumbling as can be heard by the wobbling carrier with a time constant of about 4.5 seconds. The signal is a single un-modulated carrier on 236.997Mhz. The wobbling carrier is clearly heard and can be seen also on enclosed spectrum plot as is the slow normal Doppler shift associated with its orbit. Enclosed recording was made on Dec 19th 2012. AOS was at 12:00h UTC at a frequency of 236.998 Mhz  whereas LOS was at 12:30h UTC at a frequency of 236.992 MHz. Phil used a Create Log Periodic antenna on an AZ/El mount, an LNA580 preamp by RfBay and an AOR AR5000 receiver with an SDR-IQ connected at the IF output. The spectrum plot was generated with Spectravue. Recording and spectrum plot kindly provided by Phil Williams.

Enclosed signal of the wobbling carrier of LES-1 was received and recorded on 236.998 MHz in USB on December 27th 2012 at 06:50 UTC by Matthias DD1US.

Enclosed spectrum plot of carrier of LES-1 shows that there are 2 time periods visible in the waterfall display: the above mentioned 4 sec interval and a 30 sec interval. Possibly the satellite is spinning (every 4 sec) and rolling end over end (every 30 sec). Received and recorded on 236.99 MHz on January 4th 2013 at 11:50 UTC by Phil Williams.

Enclosed signal of LES-1 was received on December 22nd 2012 at 18:54 UTC. Recording and waterfall plot kindly provided by Flavio PY2ZX.

When LES-1 goes in the Earth shadow the transmiter will stop operating. When it gets out of the shadow it restarts transmitting with periodic frequency jumps as can be seen at the waterfall diagram enclosed. Received and recorded on 236.99 MHz on January 19th 2013 at 03:04 UTC by Phil Williams.

Pegasus 1
#01085
(1965-009A)

Pegaus 1 transmitted on 136.440 MHz (1 W) a data and on 136.89 MHz (100 mW) a beacon signal. Beacon signal recorded in February 1965 by Greg Roberts in Durban.

Feb 16th 1965

1452 kg

Pegasus 1 transmitted only as long as it was in sunlight. Recorded on 136.890 MHz using an SSB receiver end of October 1974 by Greg Roberts.

This recording was done on October 29th 1974 by Greg Roberts.

GGSE-3
#01292
(1965-016C)

GGSE-3 (Gravity Gradient Stabilization Experiment 3) was a small military satellite. Its design and deployment techniques were later applied to the NOSS / Whitecloud reconnaissance satellites. Recorded on 136.776 MHz in March 1965 by Greg Roberts.

Mar 9th 1965

4 kg

SECOR 3
EGRS-3
#01208
(1965-016E)

SECOR is an acronym for Sequential Correlation of Range and is basically an electronic distance measuring system in which four ground stations sequentially interrogate a satellite-borne transponder. It was used by the US Army Map service from 1964 onwards. Early satellites transmitted on two carrier frequencies, namely 224.5 MHz and 449 MHz. Recorded first in AM and then in FM on 136.840 MHz on Dec 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

Mar 9th 1965

18 kg

SOLRAD 7B
GRAB 6
#01291
(1965-016D)

The US satellite Solrad 7B was also called GRAB (Galactic Radiation Experimental Background ) and was officially instrumented to detect the solar X-ray emission. The first GRAB satellite was launched in 1960. However its receivers were used to catalogue the waveforms and pulse repetition frequencies of Soviet air defense radars. The basic concept of operation is shown in the diagram to the right. Recorded on 136.800 MHz in AM/FM by Mike D. Kenny.

Mar 9th 1965

47 kg

Enclosed signal from Solrad-7B was received on Dec. 30th 2012 at 09:30 UTC. The waterfall plot shows interesting jumps in the center frequency. Kindly provided by Flavio PY2ZX.

Beacon C
(Explorer 27)
#01328
(1965-032A)

Explorer 27 was also called Beacon C and investigated the ionosphere. It transmitted on 136.740 MHz. Recorded June 7th 1975 in CW by Greg Roberts.

Apr 29th 1965

60 kg

Recorded June 7th 1975 in FM by Greg Roberts.

Recorded June 7th 1975 in FM by Greg Roberts.

Recorded May 17th 1972 on 136.740 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Explorer 27 recorded on Oct 24th 1973 on 136.740 MHz in AM mode by Greg Roberts.

Pegasus 2
#01381
(1965-039A)

Pegasus 2 was a huge scientific satellite for the observation of meteorites. It transmitted on 136.410 MHz (data) and 136.890 MHz (telemetry and tracking beacon). Recorded on October 15th 1973 in AM most likely on 136.890 MHz by Greg Roberts.

May 25th 1965

10500 kg

Pegasus 2 CW transmission increased suddenly whenever the satellite entered the shadow of the Earth. This can be heard nicely on this recording in CW mode on October 24th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

TIROS-10
OT 1
#01430
(1965-051A)

Tiros-10 (Television and InfraRed Observation Satellite) is a sun-synchronous meteorological spacecraft designed to develop improved capabilities for obtaining and using TV cloud-cover pictures from satellites and operated as an interim operational satellite. The spin-stabilized spacecraft is in the form of an 18-sided right prism, 107 cm across opposite corners and 56 cm high, with a reinforced baseplate carrying most of the subsystems and a cover assembly (hat). Electrial power is supplied to the spacecraft by approximately 9000 1- by 2-cm silicon solar cells that were mounted on the cover assembly and by 21 nickel-cadmium batteries. A single monopole antenna for reception of ground commands extends from the top of the cover assembly. A pair of crossed-dipole telemetry antennas (235 MHz) project down and diagonally out from the baseplate.
TIROS-10 features an advanced vidicon camera system (AVCS). AVCS (television) transmission was at 235 MHz with 2 W output power.
TIROS-10 transmits tracking signals with 50 mW on 136.230 (increased over lifetime to 136.235 MHz) and 136.920 MHz.
TIROS-10 features an advanced vidicon camera system (AVCS). AVCS (television) transmission was at 235 MHz with 2 W output power.
TIROS-10 transmits tracking signals with 50 mW on 136.230 (increased over lifetime to 136.235 MHz) and 136.920 MHz.

July 2nd 1965

127 kg

TIROS-10 transmitted a continuous tone on both frequencies, 136.230 and 136.920 MHz, recorded on Oct. 24th 1973 in CW and AM by Greg Roberts.

Recording made on Dec 14th 1973 on 136.230 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Recording made on Dec 14th 1973 on 136.920 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Recording made on Dec 14th 1973 on unknown frequency by Greg Roberts.

Pegasus 3
Saturn SA-10
#01467
(1965-060A)

In its stored position with panels folded inside the Apollo service module Pegasus 3 was 5.3 m high, 2.1 m wide, and only 28 cm deep. The spacecraft was equipped with appendages like wings which extended to form a huge plane 29.3 m long and 4.3 m wide. Pegasus 3 transmitted on 136.410 MHz (data) and 136.890 MHz (telemetry and tracking beacon) and sounded like the previous 2 Pegasus satellites. This signal is probably the beacon on 136.89 MHz and was recorded in the time between March 1964 and February 1965 by Greg Roberts in Durban.

Jul 30th 1965

1452 kg

GEOS 1
GEOS A
Explorer 29
#01726
(1965-089A)

GEOS 1 (Geodetic Earth Orbiting Satellite) was a gravity-gradient-stabilized, solar-cell powered satellite targeted for geodetic studies.. Recorded on 136.83 MHz in the time between November 1965 and Spring 1966 by Greg Roberts in Durban.

Nov 6th 1965

387 kg

Alouette-2
Alouette-B
#01804
(1965-098A)

Alouette 1 was a Canadian small ionospheric observatory instrumented with a sweep frequency ionospheric sounder, a VLF receiver, an energetic particle experiment, a cosmic noise experiment and a electrostatic probe. The spacecraft used two long dipole antennas (73 m and 22.8 m long). Alouette-2 had a tracking beacons transmitting with 50 mWatts on 136.980 MHz and two telemetry transmitter on 136.080 MHz (2 Watts) and 136.590 MHz (0.25 Watts).Routine operations were terminated in July 1975. The spacecraft was successfully reactivated on November 28th and 29th 1975 in order to obtain data on its 10th anniversary.

Nov. 29th 1965

147 kg

In August 2013, 48 years after its launch, signals from Alouette-2 were jointly rediscovered by Raydel Abreu Espinet CM2ESP in Cuba and Mike Kenny in Australia. All 3 transmitters could be detected. The detected signals were:
136.590 MHz : a variable strength stable carrier with weak intermittent sidebands at approx. +/- 3.5, 5.0 and 13.5 kHz
136.080 MHz : a variable strength unstable carrier 4 to 5 kHz below nominal frequency and weaker intermittent unstable sidebands at +/- 20 to 23 kHz from the carrier
136.980 MHz : a strong stable carrier only

Signals were received in SSB on October 3rd 2013 at 23:10 UTC by Raydel CM2ESP in Havanna/Cuba. Raydel used a horizontal Moxon antenna fixed pointed to Zenith and a RTL-SDR Dongle with a 35dB preamplifier. Recordings kindly provided by Raydel CM2ESP.

ESSA 2
OT 2
#02091
(1966-016A)

ESSA 2 was a meteorological satellite providing real-time earth cloud-cover TV pictures for use in weather analysis and forecasting. It transmitted telemetry on 136.500 MHz and a tracking beacon signal on 136.770 MHz. Recorded on 136.770 MHz in spring 1966 by Greg Roberts in Durban.

Feb 28th 1966

286 kg

COSMOS 114
Zenit-4
#02133
(1966-028A)

2nd Generation high resolution Soviet Photo Reconnaissance satellite.
This FSK-PDM signal was recorded on 19.995 MHz on April 8
th 1966 by Sven Grahn.

Apr 6th 1966

4730 kg

SECOR 7
EGRS-7
#02411
(1966-077B)

EGRS-7 was a similar type satellite to the SECOR satellites using the same telemetry format. Frequency was 136.800 MHz. Recorded on Dec 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

Aug 19th 1966

17 kg

EGRS-7 was recorded on Oct 24th 1973 in AM mode by Greg Roberts.

SECOR-7 was received on Dec. 31st 2012 at 10:16 UTC. Waterfall plot kindly provided by Flavio PY2ZX.

ERS 15
#02412
(1966-077C)

ERS (Environmental Research Satellite) was an Air force technology satellite also known as Octahedron Research Satellite (ORS-1). Was launched together with and ejected by MIDAS-11 (1966-077A). Recorded on 137.800 MHz using an SSB receiver by Greg Roberts.

Aug 19th 1966

4.5 kg

SECOR 8
EGRS-8
#02520
(1966-089B)

The SECOR (Sequential Correlation of Range) series of satellites were used for US Military mapping purposes. Recorded first in SSB and then in AM on 136.830 MHz on Dec 14th 1973 by Greg Roberts.

Oct 5th 1966

17 kg

Recorded on May 17th 1972 on 136.830 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Intelsat 2F-1
Atlantic 1
Canary Bird
Intelsat 2A
Lanny Bird 2F1
#02514
(1966-096A)

Commercial Communication Satellite of COMSAT Corporation. Did not reach final orbit due to a failure in the apogee motor. However was still used to transmit live television and other communications traffic. Used 2 redundant repeaters with 125 MHz bandwidth supporting 240 two-way telephone circuits or one TV channel. Telemetry system used two encoders, two VHF transmitters, eight whip antennas as well as a 4 GHz beacon. The beacon signals were transmitted continuously and modulated with telemetry signals. Recorded in frequency band 136-138 MHz using an SSB receiver by Greg Roberts.

Oct 26th 1966

355 kg

Recorded on Aug 2nd 1972 in CW by Greg Roberts.

Intelsat 2F-1 stranded in an elliptical 3360 x 37038 km orbit. Recorded twice on October 24th 1973 on 136.440 MHz in CW by Greg Roberts.

Recorded in excellent quality on September 2nd 1975 on 136.440 MHz by Greg Roberts.

OV1-9
FARO 1
Manifold
#02610
(1966-111A)

OV1-9 performed radiation bio-hazard experiments. Recorded on August 2nd 1972 on 136.620 MHz by Greg Roberts.

Dec 11th 1966

104 kg

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Launch
Date

Weight

If you have further sound tracks from space objects please let me know. I will be happy to post them here on my homepage. Many thanks in advance.

Vy 55 & 73 de Matthias DD1US               


 
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