Sounds from Space

 

Sounds from Scientific, Meteorological and Commercial Satellites 1957-1961

This part of my audio collection is dedicated to commercial and scientific satellites. I started this separate section when Greg Roberts, ZS1BI in Cape Town, started to convert some of his old recordings from a tape recorder with elastic belt drives to electronic format. Greg is a retired professional astronomer and since 1957 has been actively involved in the tracking of artificial satellites, both by optical and radio means. Click on his picture to the right to get more information about him and his activities.

Greg Roberts ZS1BI

Many thanks to Greg Roberts ZS1BI for getting this section started and to all the other people who kindly contributed: Alois Ochojski DL3PD/SK, Roy Welch W0SL, Sven Grahn, Kurt Ringel DF7FU, Chris Gross, Mike D. Kenny, Brian Hougesen OZ1SKY, Michael Fletcher OH2AUE, Dale Ireland, Alan Banks, Paul Marsh M0EYT, Patrick DK193WN, Mike Rupprecht DK3WN, Loren Moline WA7SKT, Maik Hermenau, Jean-Louis Rault F6AGR, Dick Flagg AH6NM, Don P. Mitchell, Bill Chaikin KA8VIT, Dick Daniels W4PUJ/SK, Patrick Hajagos, Henk Hamoen PA3GUO, Thomas Koziel DG3IX, Tobias Lindemann, Josef Huber, Tetsu-san JA0CAW, Jan PE0SAT, Nils von Storch, Darko 9A3LI, Federico Manzini, Phil Williams, Jos Heymann, Roland Proesch DF3LZ, Davide D'Aliesio IW0HLG, Giulio Manzoni IV3DTB/9V1FC, Fer Paglia IW1DTU, Enrico Gobbetti IW2AGJ, Raydel Abreu Espinet CM2ESP, Flavio PY2ZX, Frederick W. Krappe, Colin Mackellar, Aitor Conde, Davide D'Aliesio IW0HLG, Jean-Pierre Godet F5YG, Milen Rangelov, Francisco EA7ADI, Luc VE2FXL, Roland PY4ZBZ and Rob PA0RWE.

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Launch
Date

Weight

Sputnik 1
Sputnik I
#00002 
(1957-001B)
(1957 Alpha 2)

This first man made satellite in space was launched by USSR into an elliptical orbit with an inclination of 65 degrees, a perigee of 238 km and an apogee of 947 km. Sputnik 1 needed 96,2 minutes to circulate the Earth. The spherical satellite had a diameter of 58cm and carried 2 radio beacons transmitting on 20.005 MHz and 40.010 MHz. The batteries powering the transmitters had a lifetime of 21 days. Sputnik 1 reentered the Earth's atmosphere after 92 days and decayed on January 4th 1958. Recording kindly provided by Alois DL3PD/SK.

Oct 4th 1957

83,6 kg

On October 6th 1957 around 20:00 UTC Sputnik 1 was received on 20 MHz by Bayrische Volkssternwarte in Munich. The recording was kindly provided by Tobias Lindemann and Josef Huber.

This audio file was recorded by Roy W0SL in Dallas, Texas on October 7th, 1957 at 0457UTC using a military surplus AN/FRR3A HF RTTY receiver tuned to 20.007 MHz. Thanks Roy for providing this recording.

This recording is from an unknown German ham-radio amateur. It was filtered and provided by Don P. Mitchell.

An unknown British SWL is commenting the reception of Sputnik 1 on October 11th 1957 at 10:58pm. The original source of this recording is unknown. The recording was kindly provided by Bill KA8VIT. (Please note that this recording is 5MB large).

Enclosed recording of Sputnik 1 is from a radio station in Milwaukee. The recording is from vinyl no. 1 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Sputnik 2
Sputnik II
Physical lab
PS 2
#00003
(1957-002A)
(1957 Beta 1)

Sputnik 2 was the first spaceship which brought an animal in space. The elliptical orbit had an apogee of 1770 km and an apogee of 320 km. Sputnik II circulated the Earth in 103,7 minutes.
Sputnik 2 was a three-part conical satellite with a hight of 1.2m and was comprised of the following sections:
- a cylindrical container for scientific equipment
- a spherical container for batteries, 2 transmitters and radiotelemetry systems
- a sealed cabin for the a dog named Laika
Laika lived for one week and part of the downlink telemetry was her heartbeat. She died on November 10
th 1957 when oxygen in her capsule was exhausted.
Sputnik II transmitted for 7 days on the frequencies 20.005 MHz and 40.010 MHz.
Sputnik 2 decayed on April 14
th 1958. This recording was provided by Alois DL3PD/SK.

Nov 3rd 1957

508 kg

Enclosed is the recording of the heartbeat of the dog Laika aboard Sputnik 2. The recording is from vinyl no. 2 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

In June 2010 I received from Dick W4PUJ/SK
(ex WA4DGU) together with a number of other unique audio recordings enclosed recording of Sputnik II. Thanks Dick for providing this recording. Dick became silent key on February 14
th 2012.

Explorer 1
Explorer I
1958 Alpha 1
#00004
(1958-001A)

Explorer 1 was America's first orbiting satellite. It was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida by an Army Jupiter C four stage rocket into an elliptical orbit with an inclination of 33,3 degrees, a perigee of 320 km  and an apogee of 2735 km. Explorer 1 circulated the Earth in 114,7 minutes.
The cylindrical satellite was 1.5m long and had a diameter of 15cm. Explorer 1 featured 2 transmitters. The transmitter on 108,03 MHz had a transmit power of 60 mW and operated 14 days, the transmitter on 108,0 MHz had a transmit power of 10 mW and transmitted until May 23
rd 1958. The transmissions included information about the satellites temperature, cosmic rays and micro-meteorites. In the second picture to the left you can see a mesh of wires around the upper part of the satellite. This was used to detect micro-meteorites. Explorer 1 discovered the Van Allen radiation belt.
The batteries lasted about 3 months.  Explorer 1 decayed on March 31st 1970.

Jan 31st 1958

13,5 kg

This recording of the countdown and launch of Explorer 1 is from vinyl no. 2 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

This recording was made by Roy W0SL in Dallas, Texas on February 11th, 1958 at 01:00 UTC using a home-made VHF converter in front of a National NC-300 receiver. This recording was kindly provided by Roy W0SL.

Another recording of Explorer I was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

These recordings of Explorer 1 are from vinyls no. 4 and no. 53 which were included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Explorer 2
Explorer II
EXPLR2

Explorer 2 was an exact duplicate of Explorer 1. The launch of Explorer 2 atop a Jupiter-c rocket failed due to a failure in its 4th stage and the satellite did not reach orbit.

Mar 3rd 1958

14,5 kg

This recording of the launch of Explorer 2 is from vinyl no. 3 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Vanguard 1
TV-4
1958 Beta 2
#00005
(1958-002B)

This is the oldest man-made satellite which is still in orbit. It is expected to last about another 190 years before it finally decays. This spherical Navy test satellite has a diameter of 16cm and was launched by a Vanguard 3-stage rocket into an elliptical orbit with an inclination of 34,4 degrees, a perigee of 640 km and an apogee of 4020 km. The satellite had 2 power sources: the first transmitter operated from a mercury cell supply and had a life time of 3 weeks. Thanks to the fact that this satellite was the first using solar cells the second transmitter operated 6 years and 3 months. On February 21st 1965 it was declared to be no more recognizable as the signal strength had declined almost to zero. The output power of the transmitters was 100mW (on 108.0 MHz) and 50mW (on 108.3 MHz) respectively. The antenna system was comprised of 6 whip elements each 30cm long. They made one turnstile antenna and a dipole. The telemetry transmitted was the package temperature indicated by the difference between the two transmitter frequencies. Therefore, the recordings were made with the receiver Beat Frequency Oscillator (BFO) turned on in order to produce an audible tone heard in the recordings. Thanks for the audio-file to Roy W0SL.

Mar 17th 1958

1.5 kg

This recording of the countdown and launch of Vanguard 1 is from vinyl no. 2 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

This recording of Vanguard 1 while it was in its 7th orbit. It is from vinyl no. 3 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

This recording of Vanguard I was done while it was battery powered and kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording of Vanguard I was done while it was solar powered and kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording of Vanguard I was done after it was already 3 months in operation and kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

Vanguard 1 transmitted until February 21st 1965. This recording of Vanguard I was done after it was already 1 year in operation and kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

 

Explorer 3
Explorer III
1958 Gamma 1
#00006
(1958-003A)

Explorer 3 was launched by the US army from Cape Canaveral on a Juno launch vehicle into an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 2809 km and a perigee 195 km.
Explorer III was spin stabilized and its payload consisted of a cosmic ray counter (a Geiger-Mueller tube), and a micrometeorite detector (erotion gauge). The satellites decayed after 93 days of operation on June 27
th 1958.

Mar 26th 1958

14.1 kg

This recording of Explorer III was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording of Explorer 3 is from vinyl no. 3 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Sputnik 3
Sputnik III
#00008
(1958-004B)

Sputnik 3 was conically shaped and 3.57m long. It had 12 scientific instruments and several radio systems. Enclosed audio file was recorded at 20.005 MHz and kindly provided by Sven Grahn.

May 15th 1958

1327 kg

This recording of Sputnik 3 is from vinyl no. 6 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

 

Explorer 4
Explorer IV
#00009
(1958-005A)

Explorer 4 was a cylindrically shaped satellite instrumented to make the first detailed measurements of charged particles (protons and electrons) trapped in the terrestrial radiation belts. It was launched into an elliptical low earth orbit with an apogee of 2220 km and a , perigee of 262 km. Explorer 4 decayed after 454 days on October 23rd 1959.

Jul 26th 1958

25.5 kg

These two recordings of Explorer IV were kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording of Explorer 4 is from vinyl no. 6 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Pioneer 3
Pioneer III
#00111
(1958-008A)

Pioneer 3 was a spin stabilized spacecraft launched by the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile agency in conjunction with NASA. The spacecraft failed to go past the Moon and into a heliocentric orbit as planned. Instead it reached an altitude of 102360 km before falling back and re-entering Earth's atmosphere. It finally burned up over Africa on December 7th at approximately 19:51 UTC.
The revised spacecraft objectives were to measure radiation in the outer Van Allen belt area using Geiger-Mueller tubes and to test the trigger mechanism for a lunar photographic experiment. A transmitter with a mass of 0.5 kg delivered a phase-modulated signal at a frequency of 960.05 MHz. The total effective radiated power was 0.18 W.

Dec 6th 1958

5.9 kg

This recording from Dick W4PUJ/SK is most likely not from Pioneer 3 but most likely from Pioneer 1.

 

SCORE
Project Score
Chatterbox
#00010
(1958-006A)

Project Score (Signal Communication by Orbiting Relay Equipment) was the first American communications satellite which was launched from Cape Canaveral using an Atlas B missile. The entire rocket was placed into low earth orbit (apogee 1480 km, perigee 177 km).
SCORE was an Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) project carried out by the Signal Corps with the Air Force providing the Atlas launching vehicle.
The total weight of the satellite was 3980 kg as it included the rocket, the payload itself had a weight of 68 kg.
The low earth orbit limited the life expectancy of the satellite to only 2 to 3 weeks, thus also limiting opportunities for real­time relay between two ground stations. Therefore, a store­and­forward mode was added by including a tape recorder, which also gave the satellite a worldwide broadcast capability.
There were actually 2 identical communications repeater terminals integrated into the fairing pods of the missile and the spacecraft's body acting as an antenna. The redundancy proved to be a good idea as no modulation was received on the carrier wave from experiment package no. 1 which was transmitting at 150 MHz.
However experiment package no. 2 transmitted on 132 MHz properly : voice and teletype messages were sent and returned in real time, and also from its experiment tape recorder. This tape recorder was loaded with new material 28 times before it finally failed due to battery depletion. The 132 MHz all vacuum tubes transmitter had an 8-W output. An additional tracking beacon operated at 108 MHz.
Project Score's actual performance was nominal with experiment operation for 12 days, planned orbit lifetime 20 days, actual orbit lifetime 35 days.

Dec 18th 1958

3980 kg

This recording of the launch of SCORE and part of the speech of President Eisenhower is from vinyl no. 5 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Score was the world's first satellite to broadcast voice including a Christmas greeting from President Dwight D. Eisenhower. His full message was: "This is the President of the United States speaking. Through the marvels of scientific advance, my voice is coming to you from a satellite circling in outer space. My message is a simple one. Through this unique means I convey to you and all mankind America's wish for peace on earth and good will to men everywhere." The transmission took place on December 19th 1958 at 20:15 UTC on 132.435 MHz.

This recording of the tracking transmitter of Project Score was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This audio recording was apparently in a lab where people were receiving the signals of Project Score and was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording of the signal of Project Score contains stored voice and was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording of the teletype signal of Project Score was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

 

Vanguard 2
Vanguard II
#00011
(1959-001A)

Vanguard 2 was an Earth Science satellite built and launched from Cape Canaveral into an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 3320 km and a perigee of 559 km.
The mission of the 50cm spherical and spin stabilized satellite was to measure cloud distributions.
Equipped with infrared scanning devices to provide crude mapping of the Earth's cloud cover and a tape recorder to store the information Vanguard 2 made 211 orbits and and was successfully interrogated 155 times to release the stored information.
Radio communication was provided by a 1 W, 108.03 MHz telemetry transmitter and a 10 mW, 108 MHz beacon transmitter that sent a continuous signal for tracking purposes.
Both transmitters operated for 19 days until the mercury batteries were drained.

Feb 17th 1959

9.8 kg

Explorer 6
Explorer VI
Able 3
S 2
#00015
(1959-004A)

Explorer 6 was launched by USA from Cape Canaveral on Thor-Able launch vehicle into a highly elliptical orbit with an apogee of 41900 km and a perigee of 237 km. The mission of this small, spheroidal satellite was to study trapped radiation of various energies, galactic cosmic rays, geomagnetism, radio propagation in the upper atmosphere, as well as the flux of micro-meteorites. It also tested a scanning device designed for photographing the earth's cloud cover.
Each experiment except the television scanner had two outputs, digital and analog. A UHF transmitter was used for the digital telemetry and the TV signal. Two VHF transmitters were used to transmit the analog signal. The VHF transmitters were operated continuously. The UHF transmitter was operated for only a few hours each day.
Four solar cell paddles mounted near its equator recharged the storage batteries while in orbit. Only 3 of the paddles were deployed. The expected lifetime was 1 year, the actual operation was 2 months.

Aug 7th 1959

64.4 kg

This recording of Explorer VI was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

Discoverer 5
KH-1 9002
#00018
(1959-005A)

This recording from a Discoverer satellite, possibly from Discoverer 5 or Discoverer 6, was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK. Discoverer 5 decayed on Sept. 28th 1959. The Discoverer satellites were part of the Corona program, the first series of US imaging spy satellites. Each satellite carried a single panoramic camera and a single return vehicle.

Aug 13th 1959

640 kg

Discoverer 6
KH-1 9003
#00019
(1959-006A)

This recording from a Discoverer satellite, possibly from Discoverer 5 or Discoverer 6, was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK. Discoverer 6 (also called Keyhole KH-1 9003) decayed on Oct. 20th 1959.

Aug 19th 1959

783 kg

 

Vanguard 3
Vanguard III
#00020
(1959-007A)

Vanguard 3 ( the Vanguard TV4 Backup) was launched by a Vanguard rocket from the Eastern Test Range at Cape Canaveral into a geocentric orbit with an apogee of 3744 km and an perigee of 512 km. The objectives of the flight were to measure the earth's magnetic field, the solar X-ray radiation and its effects on the earth's atmosphere, and the near-earth micro-meteoroid environment. Instrumentation included a proton magnetometer, X-ray ionization chambers, and various micro-meteoroid detectors.
Data transmission stopped after 84 days of operation on December 11
th 1959.Vanguard 3 has an expected orbital lifetime of 300 years.

Sept 18th 1959

22.7 kg

This 13 minutes audio file documents the successful launch campaign of Vanguard III. You can hear the countdown to the launch starting at T-330 seconds, the launch itself and then the later phases: 1st stage burnout at T+148 seconds, 2nd stage burnout at T+265 seconds and finally the 3rd stage ignition at T+550 seconds. This recording was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

Explorer 7
Explorer VII
S 1A
#00022
(1959-009A)

Explorer 7 was launched by USA on a Juno launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral into an elliptical low earth orbit with an apogee of 1080 km and a perigee of 553 km. The primary mission of this satellite was to measure solar X-ray and Lyman-alpha flux, trapped energetic particles, and heavy primary cosmic rays (Z>5). Secondary objectives included collecting data on micro-meteoroid penetration and molecular sputtering and studying the earth-atmosphere heat balance. The spin-stabilized satellite was powered by 3000 solar cells and 15 NiCd batteries. It transmitted telemetry on 20 MHz (1 Watt into 2 crossed dipoles) and on 108 MHz a tracking beacon signal. Useful real-time data were transmitted from its launch through February 1961 and intermittently until August 24th 1961. The original expected lifetime was 20 years.

Oct 13th 1959

41.5 kg

This recording of Explorer VII was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording of the Explorer 7 is from vinyl no. 9 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

 

TIROS I
TIROS 1
TIROS A
#00029
(1960-002B)

TIROS 1 (Television and InfraRed Observation Satellite), the first weather satellite, was designed to test the feasibility of obtaining and using TV cloud-cover pictures from satellites. It was launched on a Thor launcher from Cape Canaveral into an almost circular orbit with an apogee of 753 km and a perigee of 690 km. A single monopole antenna for reception of ground commands extended out from the top of the cover assembly. A pair of crossed-dipole telemetry antennas (235 MHz) projected down and diagonally out from the baseplate. Tiros-1 featured a beacon transmitter on 108 MHz.
The satellite performed normally from launch until June 15
th 1960, when an electrical power failure prohibited further useful TV transmissions. It sent down more than 22952 pictures of cloud formations, depicting the world as man had never seen it before. Enclosed you see the first picture sent my TIROS 1 during orbit #1 on April 1st 1960 and received by the tracking station Kaena Point on Hawaii (second tracking station was in Fort Monmouth, NJ, USA).

April 1st 1960

123 kg

This recording of Tiros I was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

These recordings of the Tiros 1 satellite are from vinyl no. 10 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Transit 1B
#00031
(1960-003B)

Navy Transit 1B was launched into orbit by Thor-Able-Star from Cape Canaveral. The payload was a navigation experiment where the receivers on Earth measured the Doppler shift of the radio signal from the satellite. The ground stations knew the satellite orbit data and thus could calculate their position on Earth. Transit 1B also was first demonstrating an engine restart in space.

April 13th 1960

600 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 12 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

 

Sputnik 4
Sputnik IV
Korabl-Sputnik 1
#00034
( 1960-005A)

Sputnik 4 (also called Korabl-Sputnik 1) was launched from former U.S.S.R from Baykonur Cosmodrome into an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 675 km and a perigee of 280 km.
This first of a series of spacecraft used to investigate the means for manned space flight, contained scientific instruments, a television system, and a self-sustaining biological cabin with a dummy of a man. The spacecraft was designed to study the operation of the life support system and the stresses of flight. The spacecraft radioed both extensive telemetry and prerecorded voice communications. After four days of flight, the reentry cabin was separated from its service module and retro-rockets were fired, but because of an incorrect attitude the spacecraft did not reenter the atmosphere.

May 15th 1960

1477 kg

This recording of Sputnik IV was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording of Korabl-Sputnik 1 is from Bochum/Germany and was on vinyl no. 12 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

MIDAS 2
AGENA A
#00043
(1960-006A)

The MIDAS 2 (Missile Defense Alarm System) satellite was an earth-orbiting satellite designed to measure IR background and define IR sources. The satellite included the second stage of theAtlas 45D rocket. The chemical-battery powered satellite transmitted for 2 days with the final transmission on May 26th 1960.

May 24th 1960

2300 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 13 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Transit 2A
#00045
(1960-007A)

The Transit 2A spacecraft was equipped with the following instruments: cosmic-noise radiometer, transmitters, infrared scanner to measure satellite rotation before despin was initiated and temperature sensors. The power supply was a nickel-cadmium battery, recharged by solar cells. The transmitters operated at the following frequencies: 54, 162, 216, and 324 MHz.

June 22nd 1960

101 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 20 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

 

Echo 1 A
Echo B
Echo Balloon
#00049
(1960-009A)

Echo 1 A is sometimes also called Echo 1 however Echo 1 was actually it predecessor which failed to launch on May 13th 1960. The Echo 1 A spacecraft was a 30.48-m-diameter balloon of mylar polyester film 0.5 mil (0.0127 mm) thick and was launched on a Thor-Delta rocket from Cape Canaveral USA into an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 1678 km and a perigee of 1519 km. The spacecraft was designed as a passive communications reflector for transcontinental and intercontinental telephone (voice), radio, and television signals. Its surface was used to reflect 960 MHz and 2390 MHz signals. It had 107.9 MHz beacon transmitters for telemetry purposes. These transmitters were powered by five nickel-cadmium batteries that were charged by 70 solar cells mounted on the balloon. Because of the large area-to-mass ratio of the spacecraft, data for the calculation of atmospheric density and solar pressure could be acquired. The expected life time was 1 year and it finally decayed on May 24th 1968.

Aug 12th 1960

76 kg

This recording of Echo 1 was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

These recordings are from vinyl no. 14 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. First the launch of Echo 1 A is reported and then signals received from Goldstone radiotelescope are provided. Finally the voice of President Eisenhower can be heard. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

 

Sputnik 5
Sputnik V
Korabl-Sputnik 2
#00055
(1960-011A)

Sputnik 5 (also called Korabl-Sputnik 2) was launched from former U.S.S.R from Baykonur Cosmodrome into an elliptical orbit with an apogee of 325 km and a perigee of 287 km.
This spacecraft was the second in a series of spacecraft designed to further the development of an Earth orbiting system for the planned manned space program.
The spacecraft carried two dogs, Strelka (eng. arrow, deut. Pfeil) and Belka (eng. squirrel, deut. Eichhörnchen), plus a grey rabbit, rats, mice, flies, plants, fungi, microscopic water plants, and seeds. Sputnik 5 returned telemetry and TV images showing the dogs' physical condition. Reported  transmission frequencies were 19.995 MHz and 83 MHz.
After a one day flight, the spacecraft and both dogs were successfully recovered. Strelka (see right picture) and Belka became the first living creatures to orbit the Earth and return safely.
I am searching for sound files. Please send them to   

Aug 19th 1960

4600 kg

 

COURIER 1B
COURIER IB
#00058
(1960-013A)

Courier 1B was a telecommunications recording satellite launched by the US into an orbit with an apogee of 1235 km and a perigee of 943 km. It was a sphere with a diameter of 130cm and its surface was covered with 19200 solar cells generating 62 Watts which were stored in batteries. It could receive, record on magnetic tape and re-broadcast voice and telegraph messages at the rate of slightly more than 67000 words a minute. COURIER IB communication system broke down after 17 days operation.

Oct 4th 1960

227 kg

This recording of Courier I B was kindly provided by Dick W4PUJ/SK.

This recording is from vinyl no. 15 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Vostok-1K No.3
Sputnik 6
Korabl-Sputnik 3
#00065
(1960-017A)

This Space Ship Vostok-1K No.3 carried two dogs, Pchelka and Mushka, as well as a television system and other scientific instruments. The flight lasted for one day. The reentry was unsuccessful, because the cabin was burned, precluding successful recovery and destroying the two animals. This recording is from vinyl no. 17 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Dec 1st 1960

4563 kg

Explorer 9
Explorer IX
S 56A
#00081
(1961-004A)

Explorer 9 was the first in a series of 3.66 m inflatable spheres to be successfully placed into orbit solely for the determination of atmospheric densities.The two hemispheres of aluminum foil were separated with a gap of Mylar at the spacecraft's equator and served as the antenna. A 136 MHz, 15 mW beacon was carried for tracking purposes, but the beacon failed on the first orbit.

Feb 16th 1961

36 kg

This recording of the Explorer 9 is from vinyl no. 21 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini.

Transit 3B
LOFTI 1
#00087
(1961-007A)

The Transit 3B spacecraft (113kg) was launched together with a secondary satellite LOFTI 1 (26kg). They were supposed to separate after launch but this failed. On the picture to the left you can see LOFTI 1 mounted on top of Transit 3B. The transit 3B satellite was powered by nickel-cadmium batteries charged by 6600 solar cells. The orbit was more elliptical than the planned circular orbit, which shortened the satellite's lifetime to 37 days.

Feb 22nd 1961

139 kg

This recording is from vinyl no. 21 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Vostok-3 No.1
Sputnik 9
Korabl-Sputnik 4
#00091
(1961-008A)

This Space Ship Vostok-3 No.1 carried a dog named Chernuska in space. Besides Chernuska also onboard was a dummy cosmonaut, mice and a guinea pig. The flight lasted for a single orbit, and a successful recovery was made. Recording provided by Alois DL3PD/SK.

Mar 9th 1961

4700 kg

Explorer 11
S 15
#00107
(1961-013A)

Explorer 11, also known as S 15, was launched for the purpose of detecting the sources of high-energy gamma rays. The spin stabilized spacecraft achieved an orbit with an apogee of 1786 km, a perigee of 486 km, a period of 108.1 min, and an inclination of 28.9 deg. Telemetry was provided only in real time by two PM transmitters, since the onboard tape recorder failed at launch.

April 27th 1961

37.2 kg

This recording of Explorer 11 was done by Heinz Kaminski in Bochum/Germany and is from vinyl no. 26 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Transit IV A
Transit 4A
#00116
(1961-015A)

The primary mission of the rather small spacecraft Transit IV A was to serve as one of four operational navigational satellites for use by ships and aircraft. The ground stations knew the satellite orbit data and thus could calculate their position on Earth. Transit 4A was the first satellite using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) based on a nuclear power source using Plutonium 238 for testing. Transit 4A tranmitted on 150.00 MHz and 400.00 MHz.

June 29th 1961

79 kg

This recording of Transit IV A is from vinyl no. 26 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Injun 1
Injun-SR-3
SOLRAD 3
GREB 3
#00117
(1961-015B)

Injun 1 was the first of a series of spacecraft designed and built by the University of Iowa to study the natural and artificial trapped radiation belts, auroras and airglow, and other geophysical phenomena. It transmitted on 136.2 MHz. Injun 1 was launched simultaneously with Transit 4A and Greb 3. Transit 4A successfully separated from Injun 1, but Greb 3 (in the lower picture to the right on top of Injun 1) did not. In the recording below you can thus hear also the interference from the signal of Injun 1 and GREB3.

June 29th 1961

16 kg

This recording of Injun 1 and GREB 3 is from vinyl no. 26 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

TIROS 3
TIROS-C
#00162
(1961-017A)

TIROS 3 (Television and InfraRed Observation Satellite) was a spin-stabilized meteorological spacecraft designed to test experimental television techniques and infrared equipment. TIROS 3 transmitted beacons on 108 .0 MHz and 108.03 MHz as well as a 2 Watt TV signal in 235 MHz. In addition it transmitted with 2 Watts on 237.8 MHz infrared pictures.

July 12th 1961

129.3 kg

This recording of TIROS 3 is from vinyl no. 26 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Transit IV B
Transit 4B
#00202
(1961-031A)

Transit 4B was a US Navy navigation satellite launched by a Thor Able Star rocket from Cape Canaveral. It carried a SNAP 3 nuclear power source. Transit, one of the first operational satellite systems, was also known as the Navy Navigation Satellite (NNS), transmitted on two separate frequencies 149.99 and 399.97 MHz.

Nov 15th 1961

86 kg

This recording of Transit IV B is from vinyl no. 36 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

TRAAC
#00205
(1961-031B)

The Transit Research and Attitude Control (TRAAC) satellite was launched by the US Navy along with Transit 4B. It was used to test the feasibility of using the earth's gravitational attraction to orient and stabilize a vehicle in space. Its boom failed to extend but it transmitted data until August 1962.

Nov 15th 1961

91 kg

This recording of TRAAC was done on Nov. 16th 1961 by the Observatorium in Bochum/Germany and is from vinyl no. 36 which was included in the Italian Enciclopaedia L置omo e lo spazio (The man and the space) issued 1965 by Fratelli Fabbri. Digitized and kindly provided by Federico Manzini

Picture

Object name
#NORAD

Description

Launch
Date

Weight

If you have further sound tracks from space objects please let me know. I will be happy to post them here on my homepage. Many thanks in advance.

Vy 55 & 73 de Matthias DD1US               


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